Special Needs Parenting

Special Need Parents have it difficult. Often it is even more difficult in the Philippines. The support system is spotty at best. The school system, even where it does accommodate special needs children, is overcrowded, teachers overworked, and children are put together in the same classroom who should not be. There is also a cultural tendency to keep special needs children hidden away at home.

Much of these problems are world-wide. With that in mind, here is a blog article that we think you might enjoy. It is called “11 Things I’ve Learned Since Becoming a Special-Needs Parent.”  Here are the first three items. To read the rest, click on the article at the bottom of this post.

1.  Not knowing is a lot harder than knowing.   Yes, there is a lot we can do via therapy to help our children walk, talk, learn, etc.  But the hardest thing to admit is that most of it is simply up to their brain and its wiring.  There are no certain predictors that a special needs child will develop speech, be able to read, be potty-trained, or become self-sufficient .  Good signs, yes.  But nothing is certain.  The not knowing can drive you crazy if you let it.

2.  The internet is a blessing and a curse.  On one hand, there is valuable information out there.  Yet, information overload can get you stuck.  You end up reading too many awful things — that often don’t apply to your child at all — and it can deplete your hope and make you paranoid.

3.  Connecting to the special-needs community (whether it be acquaintances, support groups, or the internet) can be both a lifesaver and bummer.  It is vital to find people who know what you are going through.  Yet, sometimes it can produce even more negative feelings.  Since there is always someone who has it worse than you, it can make you feel guilty for complaining.  And, since there is always someone else who has it much better, you can sometimes forget that, when it comes to parenting, stress and worry are relative.  Those people are just as immersed in their concern over their children as you are and, understandably, aren’t grateful simply because it could be worse.  It can always be worse.

To Read More, Click on THIS ARTICLE

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